Gay Pride in Auckland

Considering that New Zealand passed the Homosexual Law Reform Bill as late as1986, the celebration of Pride has leapt ahead.  By contrast, London Gay Pride’s attempts to turn into a parade or carnival, have failed.  It has remained essentially a march, albeit a huge one, with an after party in Trafalgar Square or in a club of one’s choice, all happening on the one day.

In Auckland, celebrations now go on for two weeks, beginning with a huge cultural offer which, quite frankly, puts London to shame.  Covering exhibitions, film, Literature, Theatre and Comedy, there’s also the Heroic Garden Festival where you can meet the gay garden owners.

I manage to get off Waiheke Island to a couple of the theatre shows in town.

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Chris Parker in No more Dancing in the Good Room

Chris Parker’s No More Dancing in the Good Room is a coming out one man show indulging Chris’s desire to dance ballet.  There’s not quite enough material to make the show work but the finale where Chris dances a duet with a home movie of his younger self in the kitchen is very moving.

Living on an Island, I make the most of time in the city and see The Legacy Project in the same evening.  Here, six emerging queer writers, present short plays.  Things are looking good for the future of queer theatre writing, particularly with the introduction of Trans issues.  Trans (male to female or female to male) is the new frontier to be won and two of the plays bravely make a start on what proves to be a rich subject and hopefully work for trans performers in the future.  The Pronoun Game was the most confrontational and experimental of the six plays.  The premise is the cleaning of a bedroom, but the subtext delves into gender identity and Trans/intersex possibilities.  Clad in a flesh coloured body stocking the protagonist seems asexual but  several conversations with friends and colleagues later conclude that being naked might have been an even bolder decision.  My favourite, however, is Sean Carley’s The Last Date.  A man in his fifties wants to try sex with a man before he dies.  Bedevilled by inaccurate on-line dating information, neither man is what the other expects.  This chimed with me in my current dilemma, to date younger men or continue looking for that elusive companion around my own age.

Hard working Proud to Play Organisers Craig (Centre) and Dion (R) with Volunteer Marjo
Hard working Proud to Play Organisers Craig (Centre) and Dion (R) with Volunteer Marjo
Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse
Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse

My main focus at this time is on swimming. I’m on the committee organising the Swimming Competition, part of the Proud to Play sporting festival. I end up with two contrasting tasks, organising a voucher system for volunteers to get a filled roll (ham or egg) from the pool café and inviting the Deputy Mayor, Penny Hulse to open the event.

The Voucher job involves contacting the café manager for a quote and designing the voucher – easy.  Inviting the Deputy Mayor involves getting her contact details off the council website, calling her mobile number to leave a message with a follow up email.   She replies almost immediately with a yes and there follows an event sheet from her office to be filled in and returned – almost as easy as the vouchers. I can’t imagine the Deputy Mayor of London being so accessible or available.

Kevin and Elizabeth from TAMS get ready
Kevin and Elizabeth from TAMS get ready

I also volunteer for the Ocean Swim event. This is an opportunity for Proud to Play to combine with the Bean Rock swim starting and ending at Mission Bay on the Saturday.  Taking my fold up bike on the 8am ferry, I cycle around the harbour.  My job is to tick the Proud to Play swimmers off the list, get them to sign a waiver form and issue a purple/blue swim cap so we can identify them as they come in. My choice of UK English is picked up by a couple of cute American Guys who read ‘tick off’ as ‘told off’. They like that.   The distance out to Bean Rock and back is 3.2K and around the half way buoy 1.6k.  Two of us ‘check off’ (US & Kiwi English) the purple caps as they come in, for place and time.

Purple caps ready for the off.
Purple caps ready for the off.
Off they all go. Green caps n the 1.6K Yellow caps for those who are nervous
Off they all go. Green caps n the 1.6K Yellow caps for those who are nervous

Later we have our own medal ceremony and I get to award the guys – medal over the head and kiss on the cheek.  I then cycle off to do a final swim session in the 50m pool at Newmarket before our meet on Monday.  Standing on my feet all morning has taken its toll and after doing a sedate 1,400m I can hardly move my legs. The ride from the pool to downtown is all

TAMS medal winners Jeremy, David & Cynthia
TAMS medal winners Jeremy, David & Cynthia

down-hill and one of my favourite freewheeling journeys, so my legs come back to life and I arrive at Silo Park down by Auckland harbour all ready for the games opening ceremony.  A powhiri (welcome) from the local Maori has been organised and we, the people of Auckland welcome our visitors onto the land.  I’m always moved by this part of our culture and am pleased that it has become so much a part of tradition in Auckland.  Local ‘out’ lesbian MP Louisa Wall, who promoted the gay marriage bill is there along with the Mayor of Auckland Len Brown accompanied by his ‘Rainbow Advisory Board’.  It’s a great opening event and to my delight Trans activist and academic, Lexie Matheson is on that board.  I’ve not met up with her since we worked together as Actors in 1977 – a lovely reunion.

Maori Warriors stand guard
Maori Warriors stand guard
The guests approach
The guests approach

Sunday is Big Gay Out at Coyle Park, Point Chevalier.  For me, this is another volunteer job on the Proud to Play tent.  BGO is the usual info and merchandising tents with bars and a music stage with live acts.

The Haka
P2P volunteers release the rainbow balloons.
P2P volunteers release the rainbow balloons.

It’s become a tradition for the Prime Minister of the day to attend, but this year apparently, Prime Minister John Key got booed off the stage.  He hasn’t had a good month as reaction to the Trans Pacific Partnership kept him a way from the annual Waitangi Day Celebrations.  I miss all the drama – too busy sorting out registrations for gay athletes and by 4.30 I’m ready to cycle off to the ferry for an early night on Waiheke.

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